Here’s 11 health changes I’ve made in my 50’s (that I wasn’t doing in my 40’s).

DSC_0061

Remember your 40s? I certainly do, and although I’m approaching the middle of my fifth decade, I’m feeling just as good as I did a decade ago. I credit this well-being with recognizing I needed to make some lifestyle adjustments as I became more chronologically established in middle age. So here are 11 things I’m doing for my health in my 50s that I wasn’t doing in my 40s…and why. Read More

What’s the deal with human growth hormone (HGH)?

Screen Shot 2016-08-06 at 8.37.12 AM

What is human growth hormone?

HGH is a hormone and a protein produced in the pituitary gland. Although it has a role in maintaining healthy tissue overall, it is probably best known for assisting in increasing muscle mass and bone density and an ability to promote cell growth and regeneration by activating receptors to initiate the process. Human growth hormone also can boost libido, slow the progression of age-related degenerative diseases, and help support a sense of well-being. Read More

Here’s why you shouldn’t listen to Doctors (most of the time)

Healthy Doctor

There’s a good chance you’ve been with your general practitioner for a few years. You go in a couple of times a year (hopefully no more often than that), you chat about your respective families and the state of your career, he (or she) listens, pokes, prods, palpates, and possibly prescribes. And you listen and do your best to follow instructions. Your GP is a health care professional, and there’s a degree hanging on the wall decreeing as much. So he or she must know what it takes to be healthy.

Right?

In an ideal world, the answer would be yes. But this world isn’t ideal—especially when it comes to health care.

Doctors need to prescribe behavior not pills

Most doctors aren’t in the health care business. They don’t prescribe behaviors to make us healthy. They prescribe pills and surgeries and treatments to make us un-sick. Most doctors I know only rarely mention diet or exercise or stress-relief techniques to their patients, in part because they don’t believe that their patients are willing or able to follow through with such a program. Rightly or wrongly, health care consumers have come to expect quick-fix solutions from our doctors that require little to no action on our part—except maybe to take a pill or show up for a procedure. The implied agreement between you and your doctor is that you will show up sick and he or she will give you something to make you well.

In some circles, this is changing. Doctors are literally prescribing exercise—writing “Aerobic exercise 3x/week 20 minutes/day” on their prescription pads and handing it to their patients, knowing that, to a completely sedentary person, almost no single behavior can be as beneficial to a person’s health as exercise is. Bravo to them.

Many doctors aren’t in a position to give health advice

Too many others, however, are too embarrassed or resigned to bring it up, and instead they offer a few vaguely reassuring words, and maybe prescribe a pill to treat the patient’s depression, or blood thinners to treat his cardiovascular disease. Indeed, they’ve bought in to the medical myth of the patient as a passive recipient of treatment. These doctors are sometimes seriously overweight and deeply unhealthy themselves, and they often do little to combat unhealthy habits in the people around them. In fact, studies have shown that the standard of care given by doctors is in direct relation to their own health and fitness. Obese and overweight doctors, for example, are less likely to talk to their patients about health, exercise, and nutrition.

Read More

How to lose fat and increase athletic performance while dieting

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 2.36.44 PM

It’s generally accepted that the best way to lose weight and improve or maintain fitness is to exercise regularly and cut calories. A growing number of adults are attempting to follow this advice as they find themselves fighting creeping additional pounds and obesity as they get older. However, this formula for success also has a downside, one that is especially on the minds of athletes and active adults: the risk of losing lean muscle and, as a consequence, a decline in physical performance.

One exercise method that promotes significant improvement in muscle strength and tone, cardiovascular health, and metabolic enhancement among both elite and recreational athletes is resistance weight training. This form of exercise also is associated with an increase in muscle endurance and lean muscle mass as well as a decrease in body fat, all benefits that can improve overall quality of life and fight against age-related disease and disability.

There are problems however associated with combining resistance training and a low-calorie, low-carb diet. Basically, you can lose lean muscle mass, experience poorer athletic performance, and be at greater risk of experiencing illness or exercise-related injury. At the same time, men who engage in resistance exercise during a “cut diet” require higher intake of protein so they can avoid experiencing muscle damage and loss of athletic ability. Read More

6 ways I’ve increased my testosterone after 50

At present, our testosterone levels are under siege. Various factors appear to be pulling our T levels into the gutter—from sedentary jobs to poor diets and lifestyle choices to more ominous influences like environmental toxins. One particularly disturbing study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2007, indicated that men’s testosterone levels plummeted 17 percent from 1987 to 2004—and that’s controlling for health and life- style factors, such as obesity and diabetes, that are known to affect T levels.

The study found not only that individual men were losing testosterone as they aged (which is fairly normal), but that same-age men from later eras had substantially lower T than their predecessors: a man who turned 65 in 2002, for example, had much lower T than a man who turned 65 in 1987.

At the same time, males in the United States are experiencing an increased incidence of birth defects in the penis and testicles, a higher rate of testicular cancer, and a general decline in reproductive health.

Why are these things happening? The 2007 study suggests that although poor health in general is associated with a drop in testosterone, this generational decline cannot be fully explained by obesity, depression, or diabetes. Other studies—including one compelling study of 325 over-forty men by Dr. David Handelsman of the University of Sydney—have concluded that “age alone does not make you testosterone deficient.”

I’ve actually increased my testosterone naturally 36% over the last five years. Use these tips to get the boost you need in later life:   Read More

9 things every man over 40 should be doing

Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 6.36.42 PM

When I turned 50 in May 2013, I was pretty fortunate. My family was thriving. Professionally, I was doing what I wanted to be doing. And physically, I was fitter than ever.

I was surfing the Maldives, skiing as much powder as I could find, climbing the Grand Tetons, and training regularly with some of the most accomplished athletes in the world.

When my AARP card arrived in the mail, I laughed and shredded it.

In no small part, the life I have now, just a couple of years past my half-century mark, is the result of decades of research into the best ways to achieve and maintain peak health — physical, mental, emotional and sexual — through all stages of life.

Twenty years ago, I embarked on this journey in order to stave off a number of serious medical problems that doctors told me were my genetic destiny, including prostate cancer and diabetes. Now, with my book Your New Prime: 30 Days to Better Sex, Eternal Strength, and a Kick-Ass Life After 40, I’m making it my mission to share what I’ve learned with men of all ages so that they can beat the odds as I did.

Here’s what every man should be doing for optimal health after 40:

Read the full article at MindBodyGreen

Current supplements I’m taking (Oct 6, 2015).

Screen Shot 2015-10-06 at 4.13.00 PM

I get asked a lot via email and Facebook what supplements I take so here’s a list of what I have as my “active” supplements on my office desk that I build my daily nutrition plan around. I end up taking about 60-70% of these on a daily basis. Contact me if you want any more information. Dosages are normally as directed – but some I take higher dosages (like CordycepsMagnesium L-Threonate, and Ashwagandha which I am experimenting with a lot at the moment). I’ll add to the list as things change. About 60% of these are my own research and education. The rest are from deficiencies identified with genetic testing with 23andMe (when they were legally allowed to give more information than they do now), as well as through the massive blood panels and profiling I had done with Chris Talley, who looks after Red Bull’s athletes and is a former nutritionist for NASA. Chris’s company, Precision Food Works runs probably one of the most extensive blood and urine tests on the planet. Links are to the actual products: Read More